Cadiz project refuses to die

The Cadiz project to extract groundwater from the Mojave desert was just approved the other night to move forward, environmental impact statement complete.  They’ve used some loopholes to get non-traditional agencies to approve their environmental impact assessment, building along a railroad right-of-way for example, and partnering with a water agency in Orange County, roughly 200 miles away, as the project lead.

I read through a lot of their Environmental Impact Report (EIR), the comments by various agencies, and Cadiz responses.  Whenever possible, the project team’s response has been to throw paper at the problem, without really saying anything new.  The Final EIR is some 1700 pages!  One example of the project’s low quality assessment is their analysis of desert springs likely to be affected by the groundwater pumping.  The project asserted that no springs would be affected by the pumping for some semi-legit scientific reasoning.  Then they went out to survey the local springs.  Once.  At the end of the long dry season, before the rainy season began, in November.  What a surprise, they didn’t find any significant springs!  Thorough analysis requires at least multiple trips at different times of year, with the least weight given to surveys done in the very driest part of the year!  They also have provided no — zero — water quality data to show that the groundwater they extract will be drinkable at all.  As a water chemist, this seems like a major oversight to me, especially because it was the water chemistry that played a major role in killing the project 10 years ago…

No matter, the Santa Margarita Water District has approved the project and hungrily awaits its 5,000 acre-feet per year to be delivered from 200 miles away.  What’s that?  How will the water get to the Santa Margarita Water District?  Oh, of course, by using the Metropolitan Water District’s (MWD’s) Colorado River Aqueduct.  Though this sounds efficient and reasonable, did anyone check with MWD, the largest consolidated player in Southern California’s water market?  MWD rejected nearly this same plan just 10 years ago due to environmental concerns and potentially contaminated groundwater.  I was planning to write an Op-Ed for the LA Times or somewhere similar to highlight the comments that MWD made on the EIR, but I’m happy to say that an LA Times reporter beat me to the punch.  The main issue, besides the potential for naturally occurring arsenic and chromium to enter the SoCal water supply, is this:

Metropolitan has also informed Cadiz that the aqueduct space the company is counting on may not always be available, especially during dry years when demand for the Cadiz water would likely be the greatest.

…But Kightlinger said Metropolitan has spent the past decade developing supplementary programs, such as acquiring irrigation water and holding supplies in Lake Mead, that could fill the aqueduct in dry years.

“We would pull [the Mead water] and say there is no wheeling capacity available. We’ve filled up our aqueduct,” Kightlinger said. “That’s just something they need to understand.”

Oops.  Cadiz has been asserting that the aqueduct doesn’t run full — I read the MWD annual reports from the past couple of years, and turns out, MWD has been using nearly the full capacity of that aqueduct.  I guess I would trust the aqueduct’s operator over a third party that doesn’t really believe in science!

One final note is about finances, which I read about on a message board and therefore cannot verify.  Apparently the Cadiz group (CDZI) has a bond due next year, and not enough assets to pay it off, though they do have an inflated stock price.  It is in their interest to look like the project will go forward, so they can dump their stock at a high price to meet their bond call.  I have to wonder if this whole thing has been a show all along…

Bottom line, good luck with extracting all that groundwater in Mojave.  Cuz you’ll be trucking it to Orange County at this rate.

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